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New Life Sciences Building Has Opened in Nottingham

New Life Sciences Building Has Opened in Nottingham

A new life sciences building has been opened in Nottingham that is expected to harness the life activity form the surface of the sun. The building officially opened this week and is a five-storey BioCity Discovery, that was project and cost managed by Gleeds. The project cost £30 million and it is thought that the new building will be able to support 700 new bioscience positions over the course of the next 30 years. The project is also expected to build on the cutting edge work of the existing tenant of the BioCity building.

The new life science building has been constructed on an old brownfield site that has Nottingham City Council has cleared and decontaminated. The project has been designed with the intention of achieving a BREEAM rating of ‘Excellent’ which means that it will have a reduced environmental impact. The building has been connected to the district heating system. This system means that the new construction will use energy that is provided by burning the city’s waste.

Named the Discovery building, the new Nottingham development will be found on Lower Parliament Street and has a Brise Soleil art installation on the exterior of the building which is called Corona. This is fitting considering the research that will be carried out at the new facility. The installation was designed by Wolfgang Buttress, a Nottingham artist. The artist has used scientific research that was conducted by Nottingham Trent University Dr. Martin Bencsik. The artwork on the exterior of the building will be lit up at nighttime and act as a sunscreen during the day in order to make the building more efficient.

The Discovery building has been constructed with the help of a £6 million that was given from the Local growth Fund from the D2N2 Local Enterprise Partnership. Apparently around £192 million has been allocated by D2N2 in LGF funding to be used until 2020 on infrastructure projects that specifically work to improve economic growth and job numbers.