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Shell Announces Plans to Create new Electric Charging Points

Shell Announces Plans to Create new Electric Charging Points

Royal Dutch Shell has announced that they will be joining several major car manufacturers in order to expand their electric-vehicle charging business into Europe. The world’s second largest oil company has formed this partnership as a part of their attempts to adapt into the expanding sustainable energy trend.

It has been announced by the oil company that they have signed an agreement with INOITY, which is a German venture between BMW Group, Daimler, Ford and Volkswagen. This agreement will see it provide charging stations across 10 different European nations. The deal has been announced only one month after Shell acquired Europe’s largest electric vehicle charging provider, NewMotion.

A number of different markets, such as France, the UK and China, have all previously made announcements in regards to their plans to phase out fossil-fueled cars over the course of the next few decades. These announcements have means that a wide variety of major energy companies have struggled to figure out where to go next.

The charging points that will be installed across Shell IONITY’s charging points were set to be placed across 80 of the former’s biggest highway fuel stations located throughout Europe. The intention is to install an average of six posts in each station that will take five to eight minutes to charge an electric vehicle. This expansion is a part of the oil company’s plans to have 20% of their profit margins coming from their retail forecourts to come from vehicles that don’t operate on diesel or gasoline by 2025. The increase in the number of electric charging points on the highways of Europe act as another enticement, encouraging more people to choose electrically- powered cars in order to adapt to the new sustainable energy trend, offering better access to power locations in the largest fuel stations in Europe.