Meadowhall Unveils £60m Refurb Project

Meadowhall Unveils £60m Refurb Project

Meadowhall has unveiled the details of its £60 million refurbishment scheme, which will use several firms from the Sheffield City Region for their expertise in manufacturing and design.

The project will include perforated metal cladding from Sheffield company EE Ingleton Engineering, while glass balustrade has been supplied by Dearneside.

Furthermore, there will be 0.5 acres of timber cladding sourced from FSC certified forests, a size equal to eight tennis courts.

Meadowhall Centre Director, Darren Pearce, said they are excited with how the build is progressing so far, with some top design features that they are looking forward to revealing in the new space which will continue the evolution of the shopping centre.

With such strong demand from leading brands, the new façade of the malls will reflect Meadowhall’s leading retail position, Pearce commented.

The project has also given us the opportunity to work with local businesses to ensure materials sourced are the best option environmentally, without compromising on design.”

So far, local businesses have secured 70% of the shopping complex’s construction budget.

Earlier in the year, co-owner of Meadowhall, British Land, reported that the shopping centre had enjoyed a strong year, along with a forthcoming £300 million leisure extension.

The giant property firm said that the centre’s sales were 2.2% ahead, with retailers in the mall significantly outperforming the rest of the shopping market.

British Land has also secured several new brands for the centre, including Tapas Revolution, Jack Wills, Kiko Milano, Joules and Diesel.

Now, a public consultation has been launched for the 330,000 sq ft leisure project which will aim to secure Meadowhall’s position as one of the best leisure and retail destinations in the country.

A PwC review, which British Land commissioned, outlined Medowhall’s economic and social contribution to the Sheffield City Region after it faced criticism for ‘killing’ Sheffield city centre as a shopping area when it opened in 1990.

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